Bibliografía - 2003

En American Educator vol. 27 - 2

Texto en inglés
Texto en español

Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field of researchers from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, philosophy, computer science, and anthropology who seek to understand the mind. In this regular American Educator column, we consider findings from this field that are strong and clear enough to merit classroom application.

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The teacher presents a strong, coherent lesson in which a set of significant facts is clearly connected to a reasonable conclusion. But, at test time, the students show no understanding of the connections. Some students parrot back the conclusion, but no facts. Others spit back memorized facts, but don't see how they fit together. Though the lesson wasn't taught in a rote way, it seems like rote knowledge is what the students took in. Why do well-integrated, coherent lessons often come back to us in a less meaningful, fragmented form? Can cognitive science help explain why this result is so common—and offer ideas about how to avoid it?

En American Educator vol. 27 - 4

Artículo en inglés
Artículo en español

Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field of researchers from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, philosophy, computer science, and anthropology who seek to understand the mind. In this regular American Educator column, we consider findings from this field that are strong and clear enough to merit classroom application.

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Very often, students will think they understand a body of material. Believing that they know it, they stop trying to learn more. But, come test time, it turns out they really don't know the material. Can cognitive science tell us anything about why students are commonly mistaken about what they know and don't know? Are there any strategies teachers can use to help students better estimate what they know?

VV. AA. (2003)

"The Handbook of Pragmatics Online provides up-to-date information on research in the field of linguistic pragmatics, conceived as the interdisciplinary (cognitive, social, and cultural) science of natural language use. This electronic encyclopaedia of one of the major fields of language studies is a continuously updatable source of state-of-the-art information for anyone interested in language use. The Handbook of Pragmatics Online is variously searchable and flexible to meet the needs of both beginners and established scholars in the field.

It consists of topical articles (from anaphora and bilingualism to codeswitching, cohesion, discourse markers, implicitness, mass media, negation, social institutions, and terms of address) and brief biographies of eminent scholars (such as Austin, Bühler, Grice, Morris, Sapir).

In addition, it offers an extensive overview of research traditions that belong or have contributed to pragmatics (from accommodation theory, analytical philosophy and anthropological linguistics, to cognitive linguistics, construction grammar, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, literary pragmatics, neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics, relevance theory, sociolinguistics, speech act theory, and universal and transcendental pragmatics, to name just a few), of research methods (from contrastive analysis and corpus analysis to ethnography, experimentation, logical analysis, statistics, and taxonomy), and of notation systems (from formal semantics to transcription systems for spoken discourse)."

SIL (2003)

More than 900 linguistic terms are covered in this glossary. Each term has a definition and a list of sources (see Bibliography). Many entries also include discussion, examples, hierarchical positioning of the term, and other additional information. Originally compiled by Eugene E. Loos (general editor), and editors Susan Anderson, Dwight H. Day, Jr., Paul C. Jordan, and J. Douglas Wingate as a quick reference tool for field linguists, it was last revised in 2003 but continues to be a helpful tool for many.

Glosario